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What is an Area Representative?

Probably created in response to sub-franchising, franchisors did not approve of the loss of power and sharing of royalties when they could easily have the entire cookie. The solution resulted in the arrangement known as the Franchise Area Representative.

The Area Representative pays a certain fee for the right to solicit prospective franchisees and to provide certain service to existing franchisees in a defined franchise territory. The Area Representative acts as a salesperson for the franchisor and once they find a new franchisee, the area representative does not enter into any contracts with the franchisee. They do not exercise any power unlike a Sub-franchisor. All the franchise agreements are entered into directly between the franchisor and the prospective franchisee. All payments by the prospective franchisee are made to the franchisor and no transaction takes place between the prospective franchisee and the Area Representative.

The reason why anyone would choose being an Area Representative is that they are paid a certain portion of the initial franchise fee of each new franchisee they solicit as compensation. Aside from the sales commission the area representative may get paid by the franchisor a portion of the royalties received for servicing franchisees. In some cases, franchisors will pay the area representatives a portion of the fee received from new franchisees in the reps’ territory even though the area representative may have had nothing to do with the screening or recommending that particular franchisee. However, all these and other contingencies- such as compensation for furnishing many of the pre-opening and on-going services to the franchisee- should be covered in the area representation agreement.

The area representative is most often a franchisee in the defined territory, owning one or multiple units. The area representative may own a unit completely or may have smaller ownership in several units.

Running a Franchise from Home - Is it Right for You?

The U.S. Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics recently con­ducted a survey of home-based businesses and estimated that there are just over four million self-employed, home-based workers. (The number of franchised businesses in this total was not calculated.) However, the National Association of Home-Based Businesses, in Owings Mills, MD, puts the number at closer to 50 million people. Whatever the accurate number is, it is a number that everyone agrees will only continue to rise.

How buying a franchise is different from a start-up

History has shown that a struggling economy encourages entrepreneurship, which leads to a significant increase in new start-up businesses. But what if you are a hard-working professional with limited business knowledge and resources? You are motivated and more than willing to do the work, but you need a roadmap to guide your efforts. In that case, franchising may be a good option for you.

FDD Compliance - What You Need to Know

The familiar UFOC is now obsolete. This webinar will educate you on the new terminology, new format, changes in delivery requirements, and the items in the disclosure document most changed by the new rule.