Identify the perfect franchise for you! Take our short quiz Take our free franchise quiz!
Identify the perfect franchise for you! Take our short quiz Take our free franchise quiz!
Identify the perfect franchise for you! Take our short quiz Take our free franchise quiz!

10 Questions to Ask Yourself and Your Future Franchisor

When considering prospective franchise opportunities, it’s important to know the right questions to ask to get all of the details necessary to make an informed decision about your purchase. Researching the background of your franchisor, and determining the support and assistance they will be able to offer you as you get started are just two key elements that you will want to consider before you sign any contracts.

  1. Have you and your lawyer looked over all of the franchise documents, and feel that the terms and conditions are fair and equitable? Do you understand all of the terms and conditions set out in the contract? Do you feel comfortable signing the contract?
  2. Will you have exclusive territory rights for the duration of your contract, or is there a risk that your franchisor will allow other businesses to start up within your chosen area?
  3. What will happen if you want to end your contract? Are there penalties involved, or are there circumstances under which this is acceptable?
  4. Are there any requirements within your contract that would encourage you to engage in illegal or questionable practices? This is a huge red flag that you shouldn’t be involved with the business.
  5. How many years has your franchisor been in business, and how many other franchises do they have within their chain?
  6. What kind of support will you receive as a new franchisor, and then as an established franchise? Is there training, upgrading, and emergency support available? Are there a series of scheduled visits throughout the year?
  7. Have you had an accountant review all of the figures released by the franchisor, and have these numbers been independently verified?
  8. What kind of reputation does the franchise have within the business community? Also, can you speak with other franchisees to see how they feel about working with the company?
  9. How much money will be required to purchase a franchise, and keep it running until it turns a profit?
  10. Has the franchisor investigated franchisees thoroughly enough? You will want to ensure that they are doing their part to hire qualified people on their teams to maintain brand standards before buying a franchise from the company.
Why Franchisors Don’t Like Negotiating

The first impression that the franchisee gets from reading the franchise agreement is total incomprehension, unless they are well versed in legal terminologies and phrasing. The FDD is required to be in plain English but the franchise agreement has no such requirement. Typically, the franchisor’s legal department works extremely hard to secure the franchisor’s position through the Agreement and makes it impenetrable for someone who is not a lawyer to understand. The uniform nature of the agreement for all franchisees makes it assumed that the franchisee must sign the agreement so that all the franchisees follow the same terms. Even though that is partially true, the franchisee can plead their case and negotiate terms where they believe that they are offering something unique to the franchisor.

Common Mistakes Made By the Franchisor Buyer During the Due Diligence Investigation

Franchise merger and acquisition talks always start with the best of intentions. After all, a well-executed franchise system merger can lead to enhanced scale (for increased buying power and leverage over suppliers), reduction of overhead and operating costs (through elimination of duplicate staff, departments, and locations), and increased revenue (through cross-selling of products or services, optimization of distribution channels, and bolstered brand recognition and standing in the eyes of prospective franchisees).

How Do You Pay for a Franchise?

Whether you’re purchasing a whopper from Burger King or joining the Burger King franchise system, the old mantra holds true: there’s no such thing as a free lunch. When you first get started running a franchise you need to pay a fee to allow you to enter into that franchise. These fees are the largest fees that you will normally pay a franchisor and typically range between $5,000 and $1,000,000 depending on the franchise. The franchisor charges this fee as a way to recoup the costs of expanding the franchise and to continue to grow. From a franchisee perspective, this is a major outlay and can take a long time to make back, but is a necessary step. Aspiring business owners must understand how much capital is available to them so they can ascertain how much they can afford. The cash you have at your disposal is known as liquidity, and there are numerous ways to increase your liquidity above the balance in your bank account. As a result, many people don’t realize how much capital they actually can use for investments, like launching a franchise branch. We’ll run through some of those methods below.