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Where to Find Financing for Your Franchise

finding franchising financing

In challenging economic times, it can be very difficult for small businesses to obtain sufficient financing to cover their start-up costs and operating expenses. Franchises account for a good portion of all small business start-ups, and many individuals looking for franchise financing to complement their personal investment have found it a difficult task. Fortunately, there are resources out there for entrepreneurs who are seeking non-personal financing for their franchise business, though it can take significant time and effort to secure such funds.

If you decide that you do want to obtain financing for your franchise business from external sources, you should:

Possible Sources of Funding
The Franchise Registry

A large number of franchisors are listed on the SBA Franchise Registry. Franchisors listed on the Franchise Registry can have loan applications from their franchise candidates processed more quickly by the SBA and its lending banks since the SBA has pre-approved their franchise agreement.

Friends and Family

A reliable source of financing for small business owners and franchisees has come from family and friends. If there is an opportunity to obtain some working capital from a friend or family member, it can be easier to arrange than funding from an institution, although there are obvious personal matters you'll want to ensure you are comfortable taking on prior to seeking this kind of capital.

Home Equity

Once a leading source of funding for prospective franchisees, home equity loans have become less of a factor during the recession and housing downturn. However, if you have a good amount of equity in your home, this could still be a good source of funding.

Retirement funds

A number of firms specialize in arranging funding from individual retirement accounts for franchise prospects. Be sure that your accountant or personal financial adviser provides guidance, if you are considering this franchise financing option.

Franchisor Financing

Certain franchisors offer some form of financing, either directly or by providing a reduced franchise fee or by financing the franchise fee. A franchisor may also offer a special incentive program whereby a franchisee can earn a rebate off royalties if certain sales goals are reached.

Bank Financing

Banks, which have long been the primary source of franchise and small business loans, have become tough lenders. In most cases, only the very best clients, with the lowest amount of risk, can obtain financing from both large and community banks.

Veterans

The International Franchise Association (IFA) VetFran program includes more than 300 franchisors that offer discounts and incentives to veterans on franchise fees and other start-up expenses. 

Minority Lending Programs

There are various programs available for women and other minorities who are seeking funding for a new business. Although the majority of these programs are not targeted specifically to franchisees, there are some programs available for would-be franchise owners. The International Franchise Association provides information regarding funding for minorities.

Local Funding Programs

Some states and cities offer programs to entice new businesses to open in their market by providing tax credits or low-interest loans. Although participation in these programs can have stringent requirements, you may contact State or local economic development offices in your market to see if there are any programs relevant to you and whether you qualify.

Use these suggestions to determine if you can find the funding for your franchise opportunity or low cost franchise.

A Checklist for Franchising your Business

We thought it might be useful to break the process down into a to-do list for the prospective franchisor. This isn't meant to be an all-inclusive guide by any means, but the list below should give you a solid idea of what lies ahead.

What is Subfranchising?

Like the franchisor, the subfranchisor signs a subfranchising agreement with the franchisees (when a franchise is sold) in the area. Technically, the subfranchisor takes over the role of the franchisor in certain geographic regions.

Franchisor-Franchisee Independence and Joint Liability, Redux

In the Tilted Kilt case, the franchisor allegedly published an “employee handbook” for franchisees to distribute to their staff, and exerted significant control over the operation of the franchised outlet in question. If true, these are two factors that typically weigh in favor of finding the franchisor to be a “joint employer” with its franchisee, thereby potentially subjecting it to liability for the alleged harassment.